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Meet passionate Chef Glen

Meet passionate Chef Glen

Tell us about your passion for food and cooking? How did it all come about?

I had a real sweet tooth as a kid and after spending the morning surfing; I would have a real appetite to feed! So at age 11-12 I started baking simple cakes and pastries on the weekends. Then when I started high school my favorite class quickly became home economics. I was soon top of my class and loved cooking. I continued baking on the weekends and started making dinners during the week for my family. My parents were stoked – beside the mess I would make! So by the end of year 10 it was time to decide what path I wanted to take and after little thought I decided I wanted to become a chef.

My parents and teachers really encouraged me, as they knew I had a flair for food. There really was nothing else I wanted to do. I loved it! The cooking, the eating, the opportunity to travel and every morning to go surfing! I was determined to become the best I could be. So the journey began.

I chose the hospitality course for my final two years at high school, enabling me to do work experience one day a week. I chose a big resort as my first placement. I loved the rush of service. I was a sponge learning as much as I could. The head chef offered me an apprenticeship but I insisted I wanted to complete school, so the chef asked me if I could work weekends instead. I said, “sure!” If someone wanted to pay me to cook that was great!! For the next two years I worked every Friday and Saturday night and eventually one night during the week. While the rest of my friends were off partying, I was learning as much as I could and loving it. Food started to become my life and I was happy with that!

I finally finished high school and started my apprenticeship at the resort. That was really time to learn. I went to college once a week and worked long hours. It was great. I was fully immersed in the chef world and progressing well. By the end of my 2nd year I was running the pass/grill in the 5 star brasserie restaurant during the week. I ran the Café on a busy Saturday night, wrote up staff rosters and assisted in massive functions of 700 people and more. I lived with some of the other apprentices so we surfed, ate, worked and talked about food! I managed to complete my apprenticeship 6 months early and that was great – I now had my wings.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”30″]I was ready to work, surf and snowboard the world, but it was then that I was unexpectedly swept off my feet by the love of my life and my wife today, Carly. I was head over heels and followed my heart. Carly introduced me to the chef at the winery she was working at. A few weeks later I started there as a sous chef and it was there I really honed my skills. I learnt how to lead a brigade and learnt about local seasonal produce.

  After only a year it was time to move to Perth with Carly and I started at a local café that was organized through a friend from the winery. It was a lot different to what I had ever done, but I was enjoying the lifestyle. Not working nights was a bonus as I could be home with Carly. Eventually the café changed hands – I wasn’t sure how things would pan out but gave it a shot. It turned out great! I was in charge of my own kitchen leading my own team.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”30″]Three years later I felt unsure of my future. I needed a new challenge so I decided I would hand my resume to one of Perth’s best restaurants that I loved. To my surprise I got a trial interview. The trial consisted of a 14 hour unpaid day of work. I doubted whether I would be good enough to work there but I kept up with the other chefs. I learnt a lot that day but decided that that line of work wasn’t for me and turned down the job and decided to stay put for the time being. A week later I was told we were opening another café. That was great news and a new challenge! I relished being involved in setting up a café from scratch. I became executive chef of both cafes, writing menus and recipes for two places and most of all training a lot of new staff. It was hard work but I loved it.

[/vc_column_text][mk_image src=”https://happinessofpursuits.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/HG4.jpg” image_width=”800″ image_height=”350″ crop=”false” svg=”false” lightbox=”false” group=”_general” frame_style=”simple” target=”_self” caption_location=”inside-image” align=”center” margin_bottom=”30″ desc=”Chef Glen Hagger”][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”30″]During this time I completed a personal training course and learnt about the nutrition side of food. I wanted to teach people the joy of food and cooking and how food can really nourish the body. We also bought our own house. (Something I was desperate for so I could grow my own food). I love nothing more than picking my dinner from the garden. There’s something special about starting something from a few seeds then nurturing it for 3 to 6 months and eating fresh from the garden. It makes you really respect food, which is so easy not to do these days with so much processed food and vegetable imports.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”30″]Growing your own food really makes you learn the seasons of food. Take asparagus for example, it’s only available for 4 to 6 weeks. I also love fishing – eating a fish that you have just caught is amazing; there’s no better tasting fish.

Chef Glen’s home grown produce”][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”30″]Foraging is another love of mine. The foraged figs I picked this year were just amazing! Two kilograms of fresh black figs picked in half an hour would cost $80 in the shops – it’s surprising just how much free fresh food is around. Eating a fig warm straight off the tree is just awesome. So sweet like eating jam! For me food is my life. If I’m not cooking at work, I’m cooking at home coming up with new recipes or I’m growing, catching or foraging for food. When I’m not doing that, I’m reading about food or eating amazing food!

During this time I completed a personal training course and learnt about the nutrition side of food. I wanted to teach people the joy of food and cooking and how food can really nourish the body. We also bought our own house. (Something I was desperate for so I could grow my own food). I love nothing more than picking my dinner from the garden. There’s something special about starting something from a few seeds then nurturing it for 3 to 6 months and eating fresh from the garden. It makes you really respect food, which is so easy not to do these days with so much processed food and vegetable imports. Growing your own food really makes you learn the seasons of food. Take asparagus for example, it’s only available for 4 to 6 weeks. I also love fishing – eating a fish that you have just caught is amazing; there’s no better tasting fish.  Foraging is another love of mine. The foraged figs I picked this year were just amazing! Two kilograms of fresh black figs picked in half an hour would cost $80 in the shops – it’s surprising just how much free fresh food is around. Eating a fig warm straight off the tree is just awesome. So sweet like eating jam! For

Foraging is another love of mine. The foraged figs I picked this year were just amazing! Two kilograms of fresh black figs picked in half an hour would cost $80 in the shops – it’s surprising just how much free fresh food is around. Eating a fig warm straight off the tree is just awesome. So sweet like eating jam! For me food is my life. If I’m not cooking at work, I’m cooking at home coming up with new recipes or I’m growing, catching or foraging for food. When I’m not doing that, I’m reading about food or eating amazing food!

What has been your biggest challenge in following your passion and how did you overcome it?

I had to sacrifice a lot of my social life in the early days. I would work every Friday and Saturday so I lost a few friends but gained many more, socializing a lot with my work friends. I have also missed a lot of family occasions like birthdays and Christmas. I decided to change from working nights to days to have more time with family and friends. I still have to work weekends but I know no different so I don’t mind.

What lessons have you learnt along the way?

Always believe in yourself. Be confident in your decisions and don’t give up. Sacrifices will have to be made, but if you want it bad enough it’s worth it.

What discoveries about yourself have allowed you to realize your passion for food and cooking?

I have discovered that I have a real green thumb!

What have you enjoyed most about your career?

Probably the summers down south surfing everyday, working hard and hanging with Carly and friends. Creating dishes, always eating amazing food, progressing and overcoming new challenges.

What’s next for you? What does the future hold?  

I recently started providing cook classes to the public and I plan to keep on building my cooking class business. Another goal is to release a paleo food line including condiments, granolas and pre-pack desserts. I want to set up a website with cooking videos and blog about growing food, etc. Eventually I’d love a food van and cooking school. I’ve got a lot of work to do!

What advice would you give anyone who has a passion for food and cooking?

You have to really love it. It’s a hard industry but the rewards are worth it. Choose a path that suits your lifestyle. Many chefs I’ve known have done something else after their apprenticeship because it didn’t agree with their lifestyle. Immerse yourself in it, live and breath it. Learn where the food comes from and do you best to share that knowledge. The world’s full of junk food. Show people what real food is! 

How do you think each of us can live the fullest life possible?  

Do things that make you happy.

If you’re not happy make a change.

Don’t be scared to fail.

Don’t waste your time with people who mess you around and don’t accept you for who you are.

 

Get outdoors – nature is truly amazing. With all the technology these days it’s easy to lock yourself away and not appreciate your surroundings.

Something as simple as a sunset on a summer’s evening can bring great joy and stress relief. Best of all its free!

People who inspire you:                                                   

My wife Carly, she’s amazing, so talented and is my rock. Matt Moran’s always been my favorite chef. He’s all about produce. His food is simple but always so good.

Happiest place:

Augusta camping with the family, Smiths beach surfing, my garden and bbq out the back with the family.

Biggest passions in life:

Family, food and surfing.

Best bit of advice you have ever received:

Don’t give up and be confident in your decisions.

Most inspiring film you’ve seen:

“Chef” it inspired me to take the leap and do what I really love.

Most inspiring book you’ve read:

Quay Restaurant cookbook. Peter Gilmore’s food is so complex and unique. He has worked so hard to become one of world’s best chefs.

Anything is possible… what’s your wish?

My own island with perfect surf, where I can live off the land with just the family.

Best light-bulb moment:

Paleo gnocchi.

Philosophy you live by:

Julia’s Triumph over Cancer and Red Sky Ride

Julia’s Triumph over Cancer and Red Sky Ride

I am really honoured to share Julia’s uplifting and encouraging story with you. Julia is an amazing woman of truly remarkable strength who has triumphed over cancer. Julia is passionate about supporting organisations who do so much for others facing the same battle with cancer. Be inspired, be encouraged as you read what Julia shares:

Tell us about the Red Sky Ride that you’ve participated in:

So as you know, myself and 22 other like-minded (some say crazy) people, embark on a 1,000km bike ride around the South West of WA. We train together each weekend starting in September and the ride takes place in February. It’s six months of hard training but I love it and we all become a close knit team.

What made you decide to do the Red Sky Ride:

Back in August 2008 I noticed that something didn’t feel quite right in my right breast, so I went to my GP for a check-up. From that initial consultation it became a whirl-wind of appointments:  firstly a mammogram, then an ultrasound and fine needle biopsy and then finally a core biopsy of the breast.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”0″]The results came back that I had multiple carcinomas and I was given the news that because of the number of lumps I would have to have a mastectomy. After this news sunk in I decided that “just in case” I would prefer to have a bilateral mastectomy as I didn’t want to find cancer in my left breast at a later stage.

Within a matter of weeks I underwent a number of other tests to confirm that the cancer was contained to the breast before undergoing surgery. I ended up only taking 5 weeks off work, and was told that the operation had been a success and that it was a “no brainer.”  I would not need chemo or radiation.

However, one year later at my annual check-up it was found that there was a lump where the core biopsy had been taken (which I had put down to scar tissue), but it was in fact a Grade 3 cancer that had seeded in the tract site.

One of those million to one occurrences, but it happened to me. I was immediately booked in to get the lump removed and within a fortnight from the time of my operation I commenced 6 months of chemotherapy (4 cycles of AC and 3 cycles of CMEC for those of you who know what this all means) and 6 weeks of radiation therapy.

I remember now that I have never found anything so confronting in my life as walking into the Ivy Suite at St John of God hospital and seeing the row of armchairs, with people of all ages and walks of life hooked up to IV drips getting their treatment.I’ll quickly digress here and tell you how my children, aged 6 and 9 at the time, reacted to me telling them that I had cancer. My 6 year old daughter was really concerned that I would lose all my hair, whilst my 9 year old son was really interested in the concept of “chemo brain”, asking me if I gave him his weekly pocket money was there a chance that I would forget I had already paid him and he might get paid it again!!

Anyway, it was at one of my first visits to St John of God Hospital that I was introduced to the SolarisCare centre. This became a haven when I came in for my chemo treatments or the weekly pic-line cleaning, not only to just sit down and get a cup of tea or read some of the literature available, but also to take advantage of many of the wonderful “free” treatments on offer. And I certainly enjoyed trying out all of those treatments from the more conventional massage, acupuncture and reflexology to Reiki and Bowen therapy. The therapists were all wonderful people who put me at ease and made me feel better during this trying time in my life.

I think that organisations like Solariscare are extremely valuable, and I think it is fantastic that this is a WA initiative that other States are considering. Do you know that since my chemo treatment Solariscare is now allowed to offer their therapies in the chemo room… imagine that, whilst undergoing chemo you could have someone giving you a reflexology massage or music therapy! I really think that other States and countries should adopt this “alternative therapy” view – as you need to deal with the emotional side of cancer, not just the medical side.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”0″]I was very fortunate that my employers, the RAC, were very supportive during my treatment and held my job for me until I considered I was well enough to return to work, so when my treatment finished I moved across to NSW with my 2 children for 6 months to recuperate with my parents.

As my parents lived in a small country town in Northern NSW I decided that in order to make friends and meet people I needed to get involved in some kind of activity. I found out that the local bike shop ran social group rides on the weekend. I have always enjoyed cycling. In fact, I believe it was my good fitness level that held me in good stead whilst going through my treatment. Whilst I was initially knocked around a bit by the treatment, I didn’t suffer as much as I expected.

So off I went to the bike shop one Saturday morning and got hooked immediately. Not only was it a great way of meeting people, but it was good for my body and soul to get physically active again; and like all good bike riders enjoy that well-earned cup of coffee and a chat after a ride.

I’ll quickly digress here and tell you how my children, aged 6 and 9 at the time, reacted to me telling them that I had cancer. My 6 year old daughter was really concerned that I would lose all my hair, whilst my 9 year old son was really interested in the concept of “chemo brain”, asking me if I gave him his weekly pocket money was there a chance that I would forget I had already paid him and he might get paid it again!!

Anyway, it was at one of my first visits to St John of God Hospital that I was introduced to the SolarisCare centre. This became a haven when I came in for my chemo treatments or the weekly pic-line cleaning, not only to just sit down and get a cup of tea or read some of the literature available, but also to take advantage of many of the wonderful “free” treatments on offer. And I certainly enjoyed trying out all of those treatments from the more conventional massage, acupuncture and reflexology to Reiki and Bowen therapy. The therapists were all wonderful people who put me at ease and made me feel better during this trying time in my life.

I think that organisations like Solariscare are extremely valuable, and I think it is fantastic that this is a WA initiative that other States are considering. Do you know that since my chemo treatment Solariscare is now allowed to offer their therapies in the chemo room… imagine that, whilst undergoing chemo you could have someone giving you a reflexology massage or music therapy! I really think that other States and countries should adopt this “alternative therapy” view – as you need to deal with the emotional side of cancer, not just the medical side.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”0″]I was very fortunate that my employers, the RAC, were very supportive during my treatment and held my job for me until I considered I was well enough to return to work, so when my treatment finished I moved across to NSW with my 2 children for 6 months to recuperate with my parents.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”0″]As my parents lived in a small country town in Northern NSW I decided that in order to make friends and meet people I needed to get involved in some kind of activity. I found out that the local bike shop ran social group rides on the weekend. I have always enjoyed cycling. In fact, I believe it was my good fitness level that held me in good stead whilst going through my treatment. Whilst I was initially knocked around a bit by the treatment, I didn’t suffer as much as I expected.

So off I went to the bike shop one Saturday morning and got hooked immediately. Not only was it a great way of meeting people, but it was good for my body and soul to get physically active again; and like all good bike riders enjoy that well-earned cup of coffee and a chat after a ride.

When I returned to Perth I immediately joined a lovely group of cyclists at Bikeforce Joondalup and have ridden with them regularly ever since, making some wonderful friends, keeping fit and entering into a number of events around Perth and WA with them.

What does the future hold?

It made me feel very proud and honoured to be approached by Solariscare to become their Ride Ambassador for the Red Sky Ride held in February 2014.

I participated in the Red Sky Ride again this year.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”0″]Having been through my cancer journey I think this is a great opportunity for me to give back to those that helped me along the way. Solariscare is a wonderful organisation and I would like to urge you all to support the good work they do.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”0″]I have now been in remission for nearly 5 years and cycle around 4 times a week, run a couple of times a week and walk whenever possible. I am probably fitter now than I was when I was in my 20’s and 30’s!!

What have you learnt about yourself through your journey?

That I am stronger than I thought I was – and that positive thinking is a powerful thing.

What wisdom would you share with others who may be facing health challenges?

Ask lots of questions, get sound advice from both health professionals and others who may have also gone through a similar challenge, get a second opinion and then look at your options.

How do you think each of us can live the fullest life possible?  

Wow, that’s a tough one, but life is a gift so, I would say by:

  • being present in the now;
  • grabbing opportunities when you are presented with them, even if they are outside of your comfort zone;
  • valuing and spending time with family & friends; and
  • not taking yourself too seriously!!

A Bit of Fun

People who inspire you:

People who have gone out of their comfort zone and achieved amazing things, sometimes despite the circumstances that they were dealt with in life, for example Nick Vujicic, born with no arms or legs but such a positive, inspirational person http://www.attitudeisaltitude.com/about-nick-his-story

Happiest place:

Anywhere with my kids – I have especially happy memories of a trip the 3 of us took to Queenstown skiing. To this day we still relive the good times on that holiday. And of course… always on the bike, enjoying the camaraderie of fellow cyclists and the good chin wag and coffee afterwards!! 

Biggest passion in life:

Besides being mum to Jack and Katie, I would say cycling and eating (along with a decent red wine!), especially in the company of good friends!!   The cycling community is amazing. I formed excellent friendships in Perth through cycling with Bikeforce Joondalup, then when I moved to NSW last year and tried out the local shop ride in Ballina with Transition Cycles, I was welcomed into their group and have made great friends already.

Best bit of advice you have ever received:

Laugh loud, laugh often.

I must admit my kids and I have developed our own “funny” sense of humour and in-jokes, which I think keeps me young![

Most inspiring film you’ve seen:

The Intouchables – Dennis Van Aarde recommended it to me and I was sceptical at first because it is a French film with subtitles. But as the blog says “it is an irreverent, uplifting comedy about friendship, trust and human possibility, based on a true story between an eccentric handicapped millionaire and his street smart ex-con caretaker”. Great story, fantastic soundtrack and you end up not noticing the sub-titles.

Most inspiring book you’ve read:

I do enjoy an inspiration read, like Janine Shepherd’s “Never tell me Never.” It’s a true story about a cyclist who was hit by a truck on a training exercise and her remarkable recovery. Whilst I was going through chemo and radiation I read Lance Armstrong’s books (sometimes in the wee small hours of the morning when I couldn’t sleep) and got inspiration from his positive outlook towards his cancer journey.

 

Best light-bulb moment:

Taking up cycling after my chemo and radiation!! I look back now at the $50 bike that I bought off a friend and how I have gradually progressed with my cycling over the years (not to mention the bike upgrades since!).

The Red Sky Ride is a fine example of a group of riders from all walks of life, joined together by a common cause – most riders have had a family member affected and/or lost to cancer. They set themselves an amazing personal challenge, then support each other throughout the training and the ride itself, whilst raising a huge amount of money for a really worthwhile organisation. The riders go on to form an alumni that binds them together in the future, and I am looking forward to joining them all again in 2017 for the 10th Year Anniversary Ride!!

Anything is possible… what’s your wish?

A cancer-free world!!

Philosophy you live by:

Treat others as you would like to be treated….

Quote you live by:

A quote that always sticks in my mind is by the tennis player, Pat Cash,

“Tough times don’t last, but tough people do”…

If you enjoyed this story please share it with others.

 

Melissa’s transition from the “jungle” to the “vines”

Melissa’s transition from the “jungle” to the “vines”

Do you remember Melissa’s story of courage?

Here’s Melissa’s update about her transition from living in the city to setting up a vineyard and truffiere in the South West of Western Australia:

The next chapter of our transition ‘from the Jungle to the Vines’ officially began on Friday the 20th March, when the keys were handed over to us for our 85acre property in the beautiful South West of WA.

Our first night on the farm was a grand wake-up call that we were no longer in the city.  The first night coincided with the first rains of the season. This was a very exciting time, as our neglected vineyard and land celebrated this life-giving kick-start to the season.

That said, the first rains are also a wake-up call for the Portuguese millipedes.

Now we love our new home on this property, but as is it an un-lined shed, it provided easy access for the thousands of millipedes who decided that the light generated from the premises is all too alluring.

Let me set the scene:

We had a mattress on the floor and a 14 week old Staffie pup.  These millipedes crawled through in their thousands.  The dog was no help, just curiously observing the incoming invasion.  Clint (the other half) was sucking these little critters up into the vacuum cleaner at about the same rate as they were entering.  I was ‘Googling’ what we could do to stop our shed from being overrun.  As it turns out, light is an attraction, but fire is a good idea because they shy away from dry environments.Clint busily stoked the fire in our little potbelly in the centre of the shed, while I lined the base of the shed with salt.  The millipedes laughed at my dismal attempt to hold them back as they crawled over the token white line that ‘shall not be crossed by thy bugs’.

Clint busily stoked the fire in our little potbelly in the centre of the shed, while I lined the base of the shed with salt.  The millipedes laughed at my dismal attempt to hold them back as they crawled over the token white line that ‘shall not be crossed by thy bugs’.

The fire in our little potbelly was a great idea, given that it was freezing cold (I know we are only in March…) so we kept this burning as fiercely as we could, and turned off all the lights.

Although a little stressed about the number of millipedes that may seek refuge in our bed as we slept, the three of us (dog included) started to nod off on our mattress.  Just as I was drifting off I heard the sound of crackling.  As I opened my eyes, I saw embers firing off the pipe of the potbelly, landing all over our shed.  The pipe was red-hot and at melting point. Clint was quick to react and started putting the fire out, preventing us from burning down our shed, and possibly our property, on our very first night!

When we woke up in the morning, the millipedes had thankfully started to retreat back into their homes underground (ready for the next evening of fun and adventure in the shed) and our potbelly was no worse for wear.

We are also developing a plan to bring our vineyard back to full glory.  We are hoping to save about 40% of the existing vines – however there will be a lot of re-planting and pruning required over the coming months.

(Arguably) the most important activity will be lining our shed, in order to trap the heat in and keep the creepy crawlies out.  Thankfully the millipede invasion is a seasonal one, about two weeks during the first rains and then again in Spring. Regardless, I think a lined shed would make our little home a much happier and stress free place.

Lastly, we need to manage our grass and weeds.  We are passionate about respecting our land and keeping our property organic (bug spray in the house excluded), so we will be busy fencing away and bringing in some new farmyard friends.  Over the coming months we will have help from some cows, chooks and, my personal favourite for blackberry bush control: goats.Although we face many challenges, we are so very excited about setting up our dream home in the country.  It is not all hard work though… we did take some time out to have a paddle in our dam and enjoy a home-cooked meal overlooking our new country home.

Although we face many challenges, we are so very excited about setting up our dream home in the country.  It is not all hard work though… we did take some time out to have a paddle in our dam and enjoy a home-cooked meal overlooking our new country home.

Here’s a link to Melissa’s Story of Courage, just in case you haven’t read it. Enjoy.

 

You Never Know Who You May Meet

You Never Know Who You May Meet

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”0″]Have you ever met someone unexpectedly? We were on holiday in New York and making our way to the top of the Empire State Building when we met Bob in the elevator.

Bob was dressed in his uniform and worked at the Empire State Building. He overheard us talking and immediately posed the question in his fabulous New York accent, “Melbourne or Sydney?” Very surprised we replied, “Perth.”

This lead to an interesting conversation about Australia. Bob told us that his favourite movie was The Castle and gave us an impromptu rendition of classic oneliners from the film:[/vc_column_text][mk_image src=”https://happinessofpursuits.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/The-Castle.jpg” image_width=”250″ image_height=”350″ crop=”true” svg=”false” lightbox=”false” group=”_general” frame_style=”simple” target=”_self” caption_location=”inside-image” align=”right” margin_bottom=”10″][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”center” margin_bottom=”0″]

spacespacespacespace 

“that’s going straight to the pool room,”

 

“tell him he’s dreaming,”

 

“why would you wanna go out?”

 

“It’s the serenity.”

[/vc_column_text][mk_image src=”https://happinessofpursuits.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/BobEmpireStateBuilding.jpg” image_width=”600″ image_height=”350″ crop=”true” svg=”false” lightbox=”false” group=”_general” frame_style=”simple” target=”_self” desc=”Me with Bob at the top of the Empire State Building” caption_location=”inside-image” align=”center” margin_bottom=”10″][vc_column_text disable_pattern=”true” align=”left” margin_bottom=”0″]What a fantastic surprise! Somehow, here we were, riding in an elevator, sharing something in common with a New Yorker in the most unexpected place. It’s amazing how warm and fuzzy it made us feel. Bob told us how he had been given the film years ago as a gift from a friend and that he just loved the Aussie humour and expressions. He also told us that he was a New Yorker, born and bred, and had never travelled overseas.

It was such a surreal experience to meet someone in New York who was so familiar with an Aussie Classic. If you haven’t seen the film, I totally recommend it for a great laugh!

If you’re going to the Empire State Building anytime soon, please say hi to Bob for us!

What unexpected encounters have you had?[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]